Our network

Question 1 falls short; Nevada Board of Regents keep status |

Title (Max 100 Characters)

Question 1 falls short; Nevada Board of Regents keep status

CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — Nevada voters decided against changing the way state colleges and universities are governed under the Nevada constitution, voting down a ballot initiative that proposed removing the Board of Regents from the state constitution.

The outcome allows the Board of Regents to maintain its unique constitutional status and power over many higher education policy decisions.

The proposal was the only constitutional amendment that Nevada voters rejected in the 2020 Election.

The four other ballot questions put in front of the electorate covered topics ranging from same-sex marriage to the state's pardoning procedures and passed decisively.


Election Results: Ballot Questions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6

The "Yes on 1" campaign issued the following statement about the outcome:

"While Ballot Question 1 was not victorious, more than 626,000 Nevadans voted for greater accountability, oversight, and transparency to improve Nevada’s system of higher education. As of Nov. 15, only  3,877 votes, a .30 percent differential, separated those who voted for and against the Ballot Question.

In addition to the hundreds of thousands of voters that supported the measure, the ballot question enjoyed remarkable and unparalleled broad, bipartisan support reaching every corner of the state and representing every sector of our economy. Organizations endorsing the Ballot Question included those from labor, education, business, first responders, government, chambers of commerce, elected officials on both sides of the aisle, and members of the education community including students, faculty, alumni, and past administrators.

Although the outcome is not what the campaign had worked toward, the Yes on 1 coalition does not intend to give up on its mission to ensure greater accountability, oversight and transparency of NSHE and the Board of Regents. The coalition’s commitment and passion for improving higher education in our state remains unchanged."

Yes on 1 campaign